Our Favourite Books For 2018

Like in 2017, the whole team at Obelisk Support is contributing to a 2018 book review to inspire your future reads. Each one of us was asked to nominate one (or more) books or blogs they had really enjoyed reading in 2018 and to explain why they recommend it. We hope that you will find this list enjoyable and that through our book recommendations, you will get to know us a little bit better. In our own words, here are our favourite 2018 reads.

Caroline

At the start of the year, I read Shami Chakrabarti’s book called Of Women – looking at the status of women throughout the world and how gender inequality is the biggest inequality over any other around the globe. Not exactly a laugh a minute, but really interesting! Otherwise I enjoyed light witty autobiographies like Sarah Millican’s How to be champion which is just daft but fun and nice before going to sleep.

Dana

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind is a book by Yuval Noah Harari and The Internationalists: And Their Plan to Outlaw War by Oona Hathaway.

Debbie

On the book reads for 2018 – would you believe me if I told you that I have not finished reading a single book that I started this year 🙄 which when I think about it, is actually a great way to sum up the year that I have had and how I’m feeling generally!

If I could recommend books, they would be Becoming by Michelle Obama, Daring Greatly by Brene Brown, Sapiens A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari.

Jane

How hard can it be? by Allison Pearson is an easy read that has plenty of laughs, but at the same time touches on some very real challenges of dealing with ageism, ageing parents, living with teenagers and re-engaging as a working parent. As the main character, Kate Reddy’s life seems particularly hectic compared to most people I know, but perhaps this makes more of an entertaining holiday read. She makes some great observations about family life and has hilarious descriptions for some of the things that happen to her. This book is a sequel to her first novel, “I Don’t Know How She Does.”

Katie

My fav 2 books I have read this year- Familiar Strangers by Callum Noad -really enjoyed reading this because I had no idea what was going to happen next, although its a bit far-fetched! (also- the author is my friend and I had no idea he was good at writing, I was really impressed!). The other book is called The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Bar– it’s sad at times but also really heartwarming.

Kayleigh

I finally got around to reading The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman, the story of Antonina and Jan Zabinski earlier this year. Antonia and her husband Jan, proprietors of Warsaw Zoo during the Second World War, are two ordinary people who carried out acts of real heroism at great personal risk to themselves. The book does more than simply bring that human story of resilience to life, it also goes into great detail about the ideology and use of scientific and sociological reasoning that led to that awful dark time in history and how ordinary humans can also be convinced to endorse and carry out the most inhuman acts. Some of the detail about animal species is quite lengthy, so if it’s not an area of interest your mind could wander, but I felt it created an apt jarring effect against the descriptions of horror that were frequently happening around them.

Laure

Silence: In the Age of Noise by Norwegian explorer Erling Kagge made me think about the meaning of noise and silence in our busy lives. I had never thought of inner silence as the key of happiness or silence as a means to communicate with others, but the author does raise some very interesting points. Having climbed Everest and trekked solo to the South Pole, he knows a thing or two about silence and his thesis is quite inspiring in a ‘less is more’ way if you are looking for ways to find peace within yourself. For a more uplifting read, I really enjoyed The Gates of Rome by Conn Iggulden, the first book in a 5-book series about the life of Gaius Julius Caesar. It’s strong on world building and as a result, scenes set in Ancient Rome feel quite authentic. It’s also a lively (if not completely historically accurate) portrayal of a society where gladiators, slaves and citizens shared the same land with very different rights (or absence of rights).

Lawrance

I loved Third World Child: Born White, Zulu Bred by GG Alcock recently. GG Alcock and his brother Rauri grew up on the bank of the Tugela River in Msinga in rural KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa and this book is about growing up in a rural South African community and moving to the city.

Louisa

War on Peace by Ronan Farrow is an insightful book that draws on access to high-level people in the know.

Nadya

Watching the English: The Hidden Rules of English Behaviour by Kate Fox is a fun book to read on cold or rainy days inside. It is a must for those wanting to get a better understanding of unspoken rules of English behaviour. Kate Fox offers light-hearted yet insightful observations of the English culture and habits. What an enjoyable read!

Naz

Surprisingly, I haven’t read a book this year (not that I can recall anyway). Instead my goals have be focussed on self development, motivation and a bit of zen. A healthy mind starts with a healthy body and I’ve found vegetarian food blog Naturally Ella helpful. What I like about the blog is the option to “Explore an Ingredient” and finding healthy recipes for it, handy when you have the extra sweet potato lying around.

Sophie

A book I loved recently was Snap by Belinda Bauer. An easy to read crime novel with a great story and some fabulous characters. I’m also enjoying my cookery book – Made in India by Meera Sodha – it’s a gorgeous book with lovely inspiring photos and the recipes are easy to follow and very delicious.

Will

The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult is a great story around an horrific subject, beautifully written by a great writer.